Physiology, behaviour, and conservation of the endangered redside dace

Presented by Dr. Andy Turko

Eastburn Postdoctoral Fellow, McMaster University

 

Join us for an engaging talk from the comforts of your own home! Socializing begins at 6:30 PM, the talk begins at 7 PM.

When:  Wednesday, December 8th from 6:30 – 8 PM

RSVP:  Please complete the RSVP form to receive the Zoom meeting link.
Cost:  Pay what you want to support future student awards ($2 members, $4 non-members, or an amount of your choosing).
Contact:  Rebecca Dalton (becca.dalton@gmail.com)

Abstract: Freshwater streams and rivers are one of the most threatened habitat types globally due to the combined effects of climate change and local-scale land use changes. Changes in the thermal conditions of these habitats are especially problematic for many fishes, and my research indicates that high temperatures may be responsible for the declines of some endangered species such as the redside dace Clinostomus elongatus. First, I will discuss field studies of upper thermal tolerance and how this is influenced by ontogeny and nutrition. Next, I will demonstrate how we are using thermal tolerance data to inform future reintroduction programs. Finally, I will discuss my ongoing work that integrates behavioural temperature preferences with physiological performance to understand optimal habitat conditions for this species. Overall, my work improves our fundamental understanding of the links between habitat choice and organismal performance and indicates that thermal biology should be incorporated into ongoing conservation programs.

 

Biography: Andy Turko is a postdoctoral fellow at McMaster University, where he works with Drs. Graham Scott (Dept of Biology) and Sigal Balshine (Dept of Psychology, Neuroscience, and Behaviour). He was previously a postdoc at the Great Lakes Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Windsor and completed his Ph.D. at the University of Guelph. His research integrates physiology and behaviour to understand how fishes cope with changing environmental conditions.